El Condor Pasa

The Andes, South America

Location No.: Too many to count spanning over Argentina, Chile, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador and Colombia

Time spent there: 01/06/17 – 07/15/17

I’ve spent 6+ months traveling and hiking through the Andes with Thomas and this one song. The same song. Six months and the one song.

The Andes, in Spanish, cordillera de los Andes is the longest continental mountain range in the world, the highest mountain range outside of Asia and has the world’s highest active volcanoes.

Home of many famous peaks, including my first real mountaineering experience summiting Huayna Potosi Mountain in Bolivia at 20,000 ft. One of it’s coveted peaks is Chimborazo Mountain, farthest from the Earth’s center than any other location.

The Andes guard half of the world’s copper production. Salar de Uyuni is the world’s largest source of lithium and one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever been to.

Some Caribbean hubs are peaks of an extensive submerged continuation of the Andes in the north. La Paz, Bolivia’s seat of government, is considered the highest capital city of the world. Potatoes and tomatoes, two of the most widespread crops on our planet, originated from the Andes.

The Amazon River is born in the Andes Mountains. Traveling on it was a bucket list fulfilled experience. They are also part of the American Cordillera, a mountain range that is the “backbone” of North America, Central America, South America and Antarctica. I’ve walked on a section of this spine on the Appalachian Trail back home.

In religion and mythology of Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador; the Andes are the home of the apus. These are the spirits of the mountains that protect the local people in the highlands. We hiked through one of these sacred apus, Salkantay Mountain and visited Machu Picchu. I felt the energy.

Pretty cool mountains, right? We traveled all over the Andes and every single day I was subject to this one song. In our mutual fascination for this mountain range, Thomas decided we should listen to El Condor Pasa (If I Could) by Simon & Garfunkel. Every day.

Granted, it’s a great song. It’s part of the soundtrack for the movie Wild and I am woman hiker; the music is considered Peru’s second anthem and a national symbol of the spirit of the Andes. Appropriate for our setting, but to listen to it every single day?

El Condor Pasa, the condor passes. We constantly searched for condors while hiking. They are often seen soaring near rock cliffs, rising in heat thermals. The Andean condor is the largest flying bird in the world and one of the longest-living birds. It’s a near threatened species. Like the song, they depict freedom. They are the hammer, not the nail.

When we see them soar, we feel free.

The condor is deeply imprinted in Andean culture inspiring orchestral musical pieces like El Condor Pasa composed in 1913. Simon & Garfunkel’s cover in 1970 made it the best-known Peruvian song in the world.

With more than 4000 produced versions of the melody and after Thomas playing it hundreds of times over six months, it’s also a song I’ll be glad to never listen to again.

Albeit, tired of the song, I could spend another six months in the Andes traversing its sacred mountains, seeking the freedom of the condors, feeling the earth beneath my feet. If I could, I surely would.

 

I’d rather be a sparrow than a snail.
Yes I would.
If I could,
I surely would.

I’d rather be a hammer than a nail.
Yes I would.
If I could,
I surely would.

CHORUS
Away, I’d rather sail away
Like a swan that’s here and gone
A man grows older every day
It gives the world
Its saddest sound,
Its saddest sound.

I’d rather be a forest than a street.
Yes I would.
If I could,
I surely would.

I’d rather feel the earth beneath my feet,
Yes I would.
If I could,
I surely would.

(lyrics to El Condor Pasa “If I Could” by Simon & Garfunkel)

IMG_3934
Thomas,in front of Salkantay Mountain, one of Cusco’s 12 sacred mountains. – Peru –
IMG_1609
Salar de Uyuni, seen from Incahuasi Island. This is the world’s largest salt flat. – Bolivia –
IMG_9144
Glacier lake at the base of Fitz Roy Mountain. – Patagonia, Argentina –
IMG_9274
Sunset and the Corcovado Volcano – Patagonia, Chile –

 

 

Tilly the turtle and 20 minutes of writing

Puerto Cayo, Ecuador

Location No.: 115

Time spent here: 07/15/17 to present

5:20 to 5:40 pm, I’m supposed to write about anything for 20 minutes. Very much like physical exercise I can’t see the immediate results of this drill. I know it’s good for me, I feel some of the effects but I can’t see the final result. It takes some foresight which often seems to be accompanied by patience. In both I am sorely lacking.

So last Friday evening, Anne Marie found a green sea turtle washed up on the beach. The turtle’s injured fin prevented it from swimming properly and it seemed to have difficulty breathing. Turtle rescuing seemed to require more than just guiding the turtle back to the water. After unsuccessful attempts to return it to the ocean it’s decided that the turtle future is unknown, it may not make it.

So, should we attempt to find a rescue center or a vet, or someone who knows anything about turtles? Or should we just wait, hope for the best and see if the turtle is still there tomorrow? Should we try to provide the surroundings for a peaceful death? Do we let nature take its course?

It made me wonder. Do we let life flow, twist and turn and produce what it may or do we constantly interject, plan, prepare, build and expect to see a result of our liking? Applied to this blog experiment, do I just flow with this very slow process of communication and let it come forth whenever it’s ready? (it’s been over a year and a half since I started traveling) Or do I take a conscious look at this and question why I’m having so much internal trouble with it? Do I just fight my discomfort and post something?

Should I wait until I feel like writing something or do I sit down and complete a daily writing exercise like this one today? My 20 minutes are almost up.

Back to the turtle, after a combined effort we located the only turtle rescue center in Ecuador. We are lucky and it’s 30 minutes away from us. She is currently undergoing treatment with antibiotics and IV fluids but she is expected to make a good recovery. Her fin is not fractured and only seems to be bruised and swollen. She was baptized Tilly and will spend the next 6 months at the rescue center or until she is fully ready to go home.

The assigned writing exercise also requires me to post whatever I wrote. So, thank you for reading this ramble.

——————————————————————-

Interesting tidbits on sea turtles:

  • If you find an injured or sick sea turtle on the beach, don’t try to put it back into the water. Their injuries often prevent them from swimming properly and they can drown easily. It is best to try to find a rescue center or at least a vet.
  • Gender in green sea turtles is determined by the shape of their tails. But it takes 25-30+ years for the tails to develop fully.
  • Trash in the ocean is one of the main causes of injury and sickness for turtles. Please pick up after yourself and pick up some trash left by the other idiots out there.
  • Ecuador’s only tortoise rescue center is called Centro de Rehabilitacion de Fauna Marina del Parque Nacional Machalilla. Although it’s a government initiative, it is run by a young veterinarian who not only single handedly takes care of the turtles but also is responsible for securing monetary donations to keep the center running. If you were looking for a place to make an animal rescue related donation you might want to consider these folks.  https://www.facebook.com/Centroderehabilitacionmarina/
IMG_5031
(L-R) Monique, Thomas, Anne Marie and Antoine, the impromptu turtle rescue team
FullSizeRender
Tilly, 20 year old green sea turtle resting in “turtle ICU”